Cashmere Blanket - 1

What are cashmere blanket?

Well-known for its softness, Cashmere blankets are considered to be extremely luxurious. Yes, it is a little expensive than the other types of blankets, but its quality, its construction easily covers up the extra costs involved.

Let us try to understand how cashmere blankets are made and different grades of cashmere blankets.

How is Cashmere Blanket Made?

Cashmere is a fabric that is derived from Kashmir goats. This special type of goats is especially found in Afghanistan, China, and Iran. These goats are known to moult between the months of February to May and during this period they produce both undercoat and coarse hair. This two are separated and out of this, it is only the fine undercoat part that is used for making cashmere blankets.

 

This undercoat is then dyed and cashmere yarn is prepared out of it. The price of cashmere blankets is high as the goats produce very small amount of this fine undercoat in a year.

Grades of Cashmere Blankets?

Cashmere comes in three different grades, A, B, C. The best grade of cashmere fabric is grade A, and it has very thinner fibers as compared to the other two. Grade a cashmere blankets are the softest and are known for its long fibers. These longer fibers also determine the long life of the blanket.
Grade B cashmere carpets are not as soft as grade A, but is still highly preferred by many. Grade C, is the lowest of the cashmere blankets grade and is noticeable less soft than grade B and grade C.

Weaves of Cashmere Blankets?

Cashmere is one of those blankets that can comes in a variety of weaves. However, Herringbone. Plain and Twill are the most famous ones. It is very important to know the purpose of the blanket, before choosing a particular weave as a blanket made from same grade of cashmere, but in different weave can result in very different textures and serve different purposes.

Maintenance of Cashmere Blankets?

Cashmere blankets can be easily dry-cleaned. Ensure that you do not keep cashmere blankets under running water as it can damage the fibers of the blanket and can also result in color loss.
When the blanket is not in use, simply clean the blanket and place it in a polythene airtight bag. You can also place natural lavender or cedar wood in the bag to ensure that the blanket stays free from bacteria.

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